Concealed Carry handling-cover

Published on August 24th, 2013 | by James Ogletree

42

Concealed Carry: What Do Police Think?

Every concealed-carry permit holder has more than likely wondered how the law enforcement community feels about the “average Joe” carrying a concealed weapon. So did I. Fortunately, I have friends who are police officers in my area—some who trained me in the police academy, some who were a classmates—and could ask the questions that many of us have pondered.

image compliments of Thearmedcitizen.net

Image courtesy of thearmedcitizen.com.

How does a SWAT officer feel about concealed carry permits?

I asked this of one of my friends (name withheld for his safety, but we’ll call him Billy) who currently works as a SWAT officer, in the narcotics unit, and as a police academy instructor. I asked him how he feels about the “average Joe” carrying a concealed firearm in public. Billy stated, “Honestly, I love the idea of what the concealed weapons permit offers to the public. In the 10 years I have been a police officer, I have learned that crime finds you, no matter if you are ready or not. It does not make me nervous knowing that the person behind me at the store may be armed, it actually relaxes me to know that there is someone ready if crime knocks on his door.”

Do you get nervous when pulling someone over who reveals they have a permit and are armed?

Billy calmly said, “A traffic stop is the main cause to be nervous, as they are very dangerous. But when I am informed that the occupants are armed and they have an active permit, it tells me that they aren’t trying to hide anything.”

What are your thoughts when you get a “shots fired” call involving an armed citizen?

He replied, “I would rather process a shooting scene where the suspect got shot than an innocent person. I just get nervous when being the first on scene, as many people aren’t trained or mentally ready to shoot someone. As far as active shooters…..well, I pray that someone is carrying, so they can engage the threat and possibly save lives. I just wish the training was more in-depth, and that people realized the permit was for defense, and not for being a superhero.”

Conclusion: A concealed carry permit isn’t a badge.

Every so often we hear of a permit holder getting arrested because they either tried to be a superhero and had a bad shooting (one not justified), or anger kicks in and they use the gun offensively. All officers I spoke to said that they hate seeing a permit holder have the weight of responsibility that a permit brings keep them from making a logical choice.  The only thing that the officers do not like about the concealed carry permit is the lack of training that often accompanies it, and that the majority of those who carry aren’t ready for the mental aspect of being involved in a shooting.  Other than that, every officer I spoke with highly supports concealed carry.

 


38 comments
JunkfoodZombie
JunkfoodZombie

Here in east TN, all the cops I have encountered while carrying have been great. One time,.I was on my motorcycle and had to walk into the sherriff's building. I didn't want to leave the gun with the bike because it would not have been secure. I told a detective outside the situation. I offered to leave it with them while I went inside. he just had an officer go with me inside so as there

TimU
TimU

I keep hearing about cops who support the 2nd Amendment/citizens carrying firearms.

I have yet to meet such a cop.


The ones around hear seem to equate guns to cops and criminals only.  You are treated as the criminal until, back at the station, you can prove you aren't.  Why the proof isn't proof on scene is beyond me.

drmorris9
drmorris9

I agree that the lack of training is a concern.  I take advantage of professional training every chance I get, and would strongly advise anyone else that carries or owns a firearm for self defense to do the same.  I do not, however, support exorbitant training requirements for concealed carry.  This is just one more vehicle states can use to deny or limit concealed permits.

vetzero
vetzero

I am a trained U.S. Army soldier and now a veteran. I understand the soldier's creed and the rules of engagement. I know when, where and why to use a firearm in personal defense and/or defense of another being attacked in acts of crime.

Criminals, gangs, etc. have the element of surprise, I have the elements of my training, a strong will and firepower...to terminate any threat, then and there.

JohnSteele1
JohnSteele1

Very few "average" people are trained or ready for the prospect of taking someone's life regardless of the circumstances. We hear lots of stories about the psychological impact his/her first shooting has on a police officer so I'm not surprised that the "average Joe" is shaken. 

hartcreek
hartcreek

I need to expand on how stupid some of our local officers are.  Some of you may be aware that there was an officer infolver shhoting next door to me.  My nephews pit was shot when my step niece released the dog to attack two officers.  The dog  ran past one officer tword the second officer.  Instead of simply stepping out of the hall way into a bedroom to avoid the dog the retard of a sceond officer drew his weapon and fire three shots with his fellow officer and my dumb ass step niece direectly behind the dog and in the line of fire.  From what I have seen of my local department their officers would screw up a wet dream.

hartcreek
hartcreek

I have had not so good experiences in Washington locally.  Officers think that they can use some gay policy of their department to violate your rights.  The sunbitches think that they can disarm you just cuz they have a badge an it is policy with their limb dick department.  Also the dumb bastards assume the you are only carrying one firearm.  Washingtons permit allows carry of multiples plus the dumb bastards have no experience other then pieco of crap firearms... Glocks so when they have your weapon they are dumbshit dangerous.

shawmutt
shawmutt

Only positive feedback here. During a roadblock stop, I told the officer I had a permit and was armed as required in my state. She simply said, "I'm glad you have it!" (Not sure if she was taking about the permit or firearm) and I went on my way.

I also attend a school with a popular criminal justice degree adult program, and know cops from classes we take together. None so far have any issue with civilians carrying. One in particular is an oath keeper. It seems the only ones who want us disarmed are politicians and hoplophobes.

Muskrat
Muskrat

Great article and good points made.

gunslinger6
gunslinger6

I have my CCW, and have been pulle over for speeding ( I have a heavy foot I guess), but everytimr I place both hands at 12 o'clock on the wheel, and as soon as the officer comes up to the widow my first words are "I have a CCW permit and have a firearm on me". Everytimr the officers have thanks me for letting them know. Only once was I taken out of car and and officer took the pistol out of holster and ran my info; when he finishe he thanke me gave my pistol bak with a ticket of course. One time when a sheriff pulled me over I told him about CCW and that I have a weapon, he didn't even ask to see my CCW, but I have it to him when I have DL. Sorry for the long post but bottom line is if you are honest and upfront with the police even with CCW it always ends well. Oh and te sheriff that didn't even ask to see CCW that I have to him any way I got a warning for speeding that time

Jim P.
Jim P.

I'm ex-USAF and rarely carried, let alone fired, firearms other than in training.


Carrying concealed is a whole different animal. But the transition is to know that you want to survive an adverse encounter but you want to do the best not to ever provoke one.

I'm glad most LEOs can understand that.

ristin59
ristin59

Good article, I agree with it 100%.

I'm a ex-LEO, I don't have the experience of dealing with CCW citizens.

My time was in the 1980's, we didn't have it as it is now.

AlessioBaldi
AlessioBaldi

Good topic.

I totally agree with the officer about the needing of a more derp and specific training.

JunkfoodZombie
JunkfoodZombie

Sorry.....He just had an officer go inside withme so there were no misunderstandings. Seem to have mostly good cops around here.

JimmyOgletree
JimmyOgletree

@TimU the encounter with a police officer is much controlled by your attitude.  if pulled over and you have a bad attitude then the officer will have a bad attitude, in ten years of being a volunteer with a local PD, I have seen this come true time and time again.  Do not be closed minded with it comes to police, some are bad, many are good, a simple search will prove that many police support the 2nd amendment,

JimmyOgletree
JimmyOgletree

@drmorris9 I agree, when I am at work, and people come in and say I need to take the class, I always pass out a card to a local trainer, and explain the bodies reaction to high stress, and all that jazz, thankfully many have taken advanced training

hotairbill
hotairbill

I, also spent some time in the Army (24years). Please educate yourself about your States laws. It is a whole different world you are in, now.

JimmyOgletree
JimmyOgletree

@JohnSteele1 the first time pulling my gun was life changing, was only 22, young and dumb, thankfully I had previous training, to give me the edge.  the biggest change in my life came when I watched a young man die from a gun shot wound, 22 years old, and I couldn't help him, I have been told that will be the most life changing moment in a persons life next to having their first child, I will be writing an article about the conceal carry mind set and readiness

hartcreek
hartcreek

@JohnSteele1 Many people carry that should not.  If you can not flip that switch in your head...the kill switch then you should not be carrying.  I have done it and I had no dreams or psychological impact.

JulieVruggink
JulieVruggink

@hartcreek  Then maybe the pit should not have been released,  it is not the officers position to "step out of the way" and either allow the animal to escape and potentially cause harm to someone or be bitten himself. 

JimmyOgletree
JimmyOgletree

@hartcreek well did you know that your attitude often controls the encounter with an officer, if you have a crap attitude then the officer will more than likely return the crap attitude, not all cops are bad, don't be closed minded and you will see that

drmorris9
drmorris9

@gunslinger6 I had a similar experience here in AZ.  I was pulled over for speeding (which I was).  The officer came up to the right side of the vehicle.  I leaned over and handed my license and carry  permit to the officer together with my right hand; left hand on the top of the wheel, then placed my right hand there too.  He looked at the cary permit and said, "Where is the Weapon?"  I told him where it was on my body and he calmly and in a friendly tone said, "OK, we can just leave it there.  Don't touch or reach for it."  The rest of the stop was uneventful and he was very cordial.  He also reduced the ticket to "wasting finite resources" which carries no points.

When I lived in New Hampshire, I was approached by three guys, one coming straight on asking for a cigarette and the other two circling around to either side of me.  I exposed my gun (still in the holster) to the guy on my right as I said, "Don't smoke."  The guy motioned to his friends and and they all quickly left.  I called the police just to be the first in case they did also.  When the officer got there I handed him my carry permit and said, "I'm licensed and carrying; It's behind my right hip.  How would you like to proceed?"  He smiled and said, "I'd like you to tell me what happened" 

It has been my experience that if you are respectful and defer to their valid concern for their personal safety by showing you are not a threat, things go very well. 

JimmyOgletree
JimmyOgletree

@gunslinger6 many are like that, but some are rookies gung ho, seen it time and time again when they pick up my shoplifters

JohnSteele1
JohnSteele1

@AlessioBaldi I would add that the same things applies to training for police officers. It would be very helpful is their training officers actually taught them that there are people out there legally carrying and what the law ACTUALLY says so they didn't "make it up on the spot."

hartcreek
hartcreek

@JulieVruggink @hartcreek I agree with you that the pit should not have been released but this bafoon of an officer fired three rounds with his fellow officer and the suspect as the backstop.  This easily could have been a friendly fire death incident.

gunslinger6
gunslinger6

Well I haven't meet them being pulled over yet so I am lucky. I meet plenty of those types when I was younger, they always had something to prove and like to mess with teenagers I guess.

JimmyOgletree
JimmyOgletree

@JohnSteele1 @AlessioBaldi from my experience, the CWP class in florida is 2 hours, to cover laws and handling of firearm.  my police academy training was 14 hours of use of force then another 80 in firearms alone.  it is the officers individual responsibility to keep up on the laws, and we are taught that there are people legally carrying, the making it up on the spot is when an officer cannot admit he is wrong, and man up. 

hartcreek
hartcreek

@BobNoakes @hartcreek @JulieVruggink Took him three shots with a 40 cal and a rickochet would have easily killed his fellow officer or the suspect.  I called out to let me secure the dog before she released it.  I would not have been bitten as I had known the dog since it was a puppy and had just fed it an hour before.

BobNoakes
BobNoakes

@hartcreek @JulieVruggink  The officer wasn't shooting upward towards his partner, he was shooting down at the dog. When I was a police officer, we were trained to shoot and hit dogs so you didn't have to worry about people behind them.

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